veggie storage tips

 

 

All our vegetables are washed and cooled down as soon as possible after harvest to maximize their storage life.   Whether you want to wash any of the veggies again is optional, but we suggest following these tips to make sure your veggies store as long as possible.  

 Humidity

Low humidity will cause your greens to wilt and veggies to become soft.  Vegetable crispers are usually not effective at controlling humidity, so I recommend storing your vegetables in sealed containers/plastic bags except for onions, garlic and squash which will store better if they breath

If your bunched greens or head lettuce have already wilted you can cut the bottom of the stem off a little bit and let it sit in water and they should perk up.  

Excess humidity is not usually an issue with some exceptions in long term storage. Root veggies continue to respire (more so at warmer temperature) and condensation can build up in a sealed bag. Greens can rot from being stored while still wet from washing.  

 

Temperature

The ideal temperature for most vegetables is 0-5 c with the exception of some fruits (botanically speaking).  I suggest storing everything in the fridge except winter squash and tomatoes.   Other vegetables that you can get away with not storing in the fridge are: onions, potatoes, storage garlic, peppers and cucumbers.  

 

Pleas see the charts below for more specific recommendations for each vegetable.  




Vegetable

Ideal Temp

Ideal Humidity

How to store

Notes

Leafy greens (lettuce, spinach, chard, kale, boy choi, baby greens, herbs)

0 c

95-100%

In the fridge in a sealed container

Can revive by cutting off the end of the stem and putting in water.

Root veggies

(carrots, beets, radish, turnip, celeriac,)

0 c

95-100%

In the fridge in a sealed container. 

See below for potatoes

Green Beans

5 c

95-100%

In the fridge in a sealed container. 

Let breath if moisture builds up causing spoilage

Peas

0c

95-100%

In the fridge in a sealed container

Let breath if moisture builds up causing spoilage

Broccoli

0 c

95-100%

In the fridge in a sealed container. 


Brussle sprouts

0c

95-100%

In the fridge in a sealed container

I recommend popping them off the stalk or wrapping the whole stalk in a bag

Cabbage

0 c

95-100%

In the fridge. 

Outer leaves will conserve humidity for the inner cabbage.  If not in a container just peel off outer wilted leaves

Corn

0 c

95-100%

In the fridge in a sealed container. 

Eat as soon as possible.  

Cucumber

10 c 

95-100%

In the fridge in a sealed container. 


Eggplant

10 c

90-95%

In the fridge in a sealed container


Garlic

0 c

65-70%

In a cupboard in an open container


Leeks

0 c

70%

In the fridge

Can peel outer layer if it is wilted


Onions, fresh (summer)

0 c

95-100% 

In the fridge in a sealed container


Onions, Storage (fall)

0 c

65% for storage (fall)


0c is for long term storage and a cupboard is fine for less than 2 months storage

Onions, green bunching

0 c

95-100%

In the fridge in a sealed container


Pepper

7-15 c

90-95%

Fridge or cupboard in sealed container


Potato

4 c


90-95%

Fridge or cupboard in sealed or open container

Cold temperatures increase the conversion of starch to sugar.  For higher sugar content store close to 0c.  For lower sugar store close to 5 c

Sweet Potatoes

12c

80%



Winter Squash/Pumpkin

10c

50-70%

In a cupboard  

Handle carefully. Punctures in skin and humidity will cause spoiling

Tomato


10 c

80%

Fridge/cupboard

Refrigeration can slow ripening but too cold can cause mushiness in ripe tomatoes

Zucchini

5 – 10 c

95%

In the fridge in a sealed container


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